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Average (Turquoise) Level Instructions Average (Turquoise) Level Instructions

Average (Turquoise) Level Instructions

New Graphemes…

At this stage of the Turquoise Level, students will encounter new graphemes, which begin to build up a bank of alternative phonemes to those previously encountered. Students can read the decodable words, some of which are nonsense words. At the Lexplore Intensive Turquoise Level, these are mixed in with real words. The nonsense words can be easily distinguished by the addition of the Turquoise Level Triangle, appearing next to the word. This must be highlighted for the student and will indicate how accurately and automatically the student can decode words containing these sounds. They will never encounter a new sound combination, without being introduced to the separate phoneme or digraph first.

The phonemes, digraphs and blends are introduced in the same order largely, as in the Letters and Sounds programme, as this will be familiar for the majority of students and enables greater combinations of decodable words. In this way, students build their confidence, as they recognise familiar sounds already committed to their long-term memory stores and feel able to succeed with the reading programme. It is incredibly important that all instructors use ‘pure’, clear phonemes when instructing students and that they themselves are encouraged to use these. The benefit of using ‘pure’ phonemes in accurately decoding and blending, cannot be underestimated. It is important that the Lexplore Intensive programme makes learning enjoyable, in addition, students see their success, and this builds motivation.

Some students will already have stronger sight-reading skills and will be able to quickly read through these words as images, as opposed to decoding the sounds within them. Once students have developed their ability to sight read and are able to decode words containing the alternative vowel sounds and spellings with confidence, they can move on to the High Frequency and Tricky Words section of the Lexplore Intensive Turquoise programme.

Student and Marking PDF: Pages 6 – 17


Alternative Vowel Phonemes, Spellings and Punctuation…

At this stage of the Lexplore Intensive Turquoise Level, students will read the decodable words that are divided into the alternative spellings of the sounds that the student will encounter. These lists are not fully comprehensive but do contain the most commonly seen alternatives for these sounds. Use this section as a teaching and learning point, looking for patterns. These can be where the vowel phoneme appears in the word, or how frequently it appears in words. Students will frequently encounter these in written material. Any previous work during the programme will now support them in decoding these and more challenging letter combinations and words.

Once again, nonsense words have been included in the word lists, though at Lexplore Intensive Turquoise Level, these are mixed in with real words. The nonsense words can be easily distinguished by the addition of the Turquoise Level Triangle appearing next to the word. This must be highlighted for the student and will indicate how accurately and automatically the student can decode words containing these sounds. They will never encounter a new sound combination, without being introduced to the separate phoneme or digraphs first.

The phonemes, digraphs and blends are introduced in roughly the same order as in the Letters and Sounds programme, as this will be familiar for the majority of students and enables greater combinations of decodable words. In this way, students build their confidence, as they recognise familiar sounds already committed to their long-term memory stores and feel able to succeed with the reading programme. It is important that the Lexplore Intensive programme makes learning enjoyable, in addition, students see their success, and this builds motivation. Some students will already have stronger sight-reading skills and will be able to quickly read through these words as images, as opposed to decoding the sounds within them. Once students have developed their ability to sight read and are able to decode words containing the alternative vowel sounds and spellings with confidence, they can move on to the High Frequency and Tricky Words section of the Lexplore Intensive Turquoise Level.

At this stage, single vowels will be largely said with their short Happy sound, though the student will begin to see exceptions, where the long Huge Hug sound is said. Students will be reminded of this before decoding and reading words containing these. They will also encounter new vowel digraphs and trigraphs, where the long Huge Hug sound is said: . It is incredibly important that all instructors use ‘pure’, clear phonemes when instructing students and that they themselves are encouraged to use these. The benefit of using ‘pure’ phonemes in accurately decoding and blending, cannot be underestimated.

Although the student has been directed to the Lexplore Intensive Turquoise Level material, they may require the additional challenge of the Light Blue Level. Instructor discretion, together with a knowledge of the individual student, can be used and the student moved on more rapidly. Remember that sometimes, it is more beneficial to build the confidence of the individual, when developing phonological awareness and understanding, which may be done by going over familiar material.

Student and Marking PDF: Pages 18 – 71


Polysyllabic and Compound Words…

The polysyllabic words found in the next section, are all fully decodable. Once again, students should be encouraged to physically break these down, using their fingers, or the instructor can model this. When the words are ‘broken down’ in this way, they can then be decoded and blended through to read the word. Many students find breaking the words into their syllables is a useful way of decoding the words and further details are given in the Supporting Document about syllabification.

Compound words consist of words that are made up of two words that can ‘stand-alone’ and yet, when combined, make a new word, frequently, with a new meaning. Students will often encounter these words in their daily reading. The work they have completed in the programme so far, will now support them in decoding the letter sounds they contain. The words in this section, once again include previously learnt phonemes, so that students can build their decoding confidence without feeling overwhelmed. Some students will already have stronger sight-reading skills and will be able to read through these words as remembered ‘images’, rather than decoding them. Once again, use your professional judgement and knowledge of the child, to decide how quickly you will progress through these.

It is useful to discuss where the previously learnt vowel phonemes tend to appear in the words in this section. Discussing the position of sounds at the beginning, middle or end of words, can help with developing skills in spelling words accurately.

Before moving on to the next stage in the programme, please ensure that the student has done the section relating to High Frequency and Tricky Words.

Student and Marking PDF: Pages 72 – 76


High Frequency and Tricky Words…

During the next section, students will encounter lists of common High Frequency Words. These are quite simply, those words which occur most frequently in spoken and written material. They are often words that have little meaning on their own, but they do contribute a great deal to the meaning of a sentence.

This section also incorporates Tricky Words. These words are sometimes known as ‘irregular words’, ‘common exception words’ or ‘sight-words’. Many of these words are not decodable and therefore need to be learnt ‘by sight’. Overlearning, using the principles of precision teaching, is an excellent way to commit these to a student’s long-term memory.

Some of these tricky words do not follow typical patterns, such as in the word ‘people’ or may contain consonants that do not ‘say’ their typical sounds. These may need to be told to the student the first few times that they encounter them.

Working through these words can greatly help students develop the sight-reading skills they need, before moving on to Lexplore Light Blue Level.

Student and Marking PDF: Pages 77 – 86


Spellings…

It is recommended that the student can now begin to use the previously encountered word lists, as spelling lists. The instructor can choose which list the student should begin with, whether this is from this level or previously ones. Use knowledge of the student here, to determine which word lists are most appropriate, for example, if they struggle frequently with spelling a particular phoneme, begin with words containing that. Each page has four columns of eight words and for most children, this is a good number to choose. For those students who experience memory challenges, use four words and maybe check them more frequently.

An excellent and proven way to check spellings, is to use the ‘Trace/Copy/Memory/Eyes Shut’ routine.

The paper should be folded across the middle, so that the student can write over the top of the word/phoneme in question in the ‘trace’ section. As they do this, they should say the letters out loud. When this has been done, they should copy the word (in the ‘copy’ box) and check for accuracy. After this, the student flips the sheet over and in the ‘memory’ box, writes the word from memory, before checking and finally, writing the word with their eyes shut. Many students are amazed by how neat their writing is with their eyes closed and they enjoy the process of overlearning, without feeling like they are doing this.

Student and Marking PDF: Pages 87 – 89